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Showing posts with label Groms. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Groms. Show all posts


Kid 2 Kid & Pro SUP Shop Present SUP 4 SMILES
Saturday June 15, 2019

Volunteer with us for our 5th Annual SUP 4 SMILES, an exclusive opportunity to make a difference in the lives of children with Autism.

Children in the Kid 2 Kid Program

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Rip Curl Malibu Shop Team Rider Talia Swindal representing Malibu to the fullest this weekend at the National Scholastic Surfing Association Western Surf Championships! 2nd Place in Super Girls and 3rd Place in Girls!
A short video from Beck Adler's recent trip south of the border.


At Santa Monica High we enjoy the privilege of the beach being a short four blocks away. With this luxury comes amazing opportunities where students can easily get the incredible ocean experience that others cannot. One of these opportunities is our Samo surf team.
By Sophia Falk
Samo surf shreds into season

At Santa Monica High we enjoy the privilege of the beach being a short four blocks away. With this luxury comes amazing opportunities where students can easily get the incredible ocean experience that others cannot. One of these opportunities is our Samo surf team.

While most students can be found sleeping in on late start Wednesdays, Samo surfers are up bright and early, ready to jump into the freezing cold water to get in their extra morning practices. They also have additional competitions on the weekends.

The team is completely inclusive, and zero prior experience is required to join. Many come to surf competitively, learn a new skill or simply explore their love of the ocean. The Samo surf community even extends beyond high school, with a lot of past team members coming back to coach the next line of Samo surfers. Either way, all are welcome.

Along with competitions the team is also involved with community service, and they plan to host five “Urban Luau’s” for Los Angeles Parks and Recreation (who are affiliated with The Surf Bus, a non profit organization in Santa Monica). They are also hosting five Santa Monica “Surf Days”.

In order to expand the program, the team added a junior varsity division in the South Bay Scholastic Surf Association (SBSSA), and they continue to grow every year. Coach Marion Clark said that the team’s goal is to win their division in the SBSSA, where they have previously done very well, winning four out of five events last year.

“We want to show the Westside surf community the meaning of Aloha by how we take care of the ocean and of each other,” Clark said.

Surf team captains Tess Goddard (’19) and Gabriel Ramirez (’19), seniors who have been part of the surf team since middle school, are very familiar with that incredible community. Both feel that the surf team has been a very significant part of their high school experience.

“I met one of my absolute best friends on the team in ninth grade, so I would say it’s had a pretty big impact on my high school experience,” Goddard said.

Ramirez also loves the surf team, and says that even the struggle of waking up at 5 a.m. is bettered by getting to watch the sun rise and jump into the ocean.

“I’m on surf team because I love spending time in the ocean and surfing with friends. It brings me to a place where I can truly relax doing something I love,” Ramirez said.





The latest Bodega Boarder Crew Podcast features some local flavor by politicking with Venice Beach local West Adler about growing up in Venice, the changing lineups, contest surfing, and much more.

West's part starts at about the 30 minute mark.
Surfing was already an addiction for Taro Watanabe. Now, after a recent introduction to the international surfing circuit, Watanabe’s passion for the sport has reached a new level. The 15-year-old Malibu resident recently returned from the 2017 Vissla International Surfing Association’s World Junior Surfing Championship in Hyuga, Japan. The competition was held over a period of nine days, from Sept. 23-Oct. 1, and each surfer competed in six different heats.

Watanabe won an individual silver medal in the boys U16 competition. As part of Team USA, he helped his team take home a gold medal after narrowly beating Team Hawaii “It was a really cool experience, because I usually just surf nationally,” said Watanabe, a sophomore at Viewpoint School in Calabasas. “I would go to [different] places, but it would pretty much be against the same people.”

Watanabe said he had to adjust which board he used, going to a lighter one, because the surfing conditions in Hyuga were vastly different than the waves he normally rides at Topanga Beach in Malibu. “It was pretty cool, it was tropical like Hawaii and I didn’t expect that,” Watanabe said. “It was a good experience going there and meeting new people.” Watanabe said the waves were slower and a little weaker than he expected. Still, the experience as a whole, and his venture into international competition, had a lasting impression.
By Brittany Kapa
Surfing was already an addiction for Taro Watanabe. Now, after a recent introduction to the international surfing circuit, Watanabe’s passion for the sport has reached a new level. The 15-year-old Malibu resident recently returned from the 2017 Vissla International Surfing Association’s World Junior Surfing Championship in Hyuga, Japan. The competition was held over a period of nine days, from Sept. 23-Oct. 1, and each surfer competed in six different heats.

Watanabe won an individual silver medal in the boys U16 competition. As part of Team USA, he helped his team take home a gold medal after narrowly beating Team Hawaii “It was a really cool experience, because I usually just surf nationally,” said Watanabe, a sophomore at Viewpoint School in Calabasas. “I would go to [different] places, but it would pretty much be against the same people.”



Watanabe said he had to adjust which board he used, going to a lighter one, because the surfing conditions in Hyuga were vastly different than the waves he normally rides at Topanga Beach in Malibu. “It was pretty cool, it was tropical like Hawaii and I didn’t expect that,” Watanabe said. “It was a good experience going there and meeting new people.” Watanabe said the waves were slower and a little weaker than he expected. Still, the experience as a whole, and his venture into international competition, had a lasting impression.

“I learned that, because it was a team contest, you can never underestimate anyone because they’re from a certain country,” Watanabe said. “There are a lot of good surfers. For example, Israel, I didn’t even think there was going to be any good surfers.” Watanabe said there were some nerves going into the competition, but he tried to remain calm. “I was just surfing it heat by heat,” Watanabe said about the close competition. “I just tried to stay focused, and I just surfed my heart out.”

During his last heat Watanabe said he was not getting the waves he had hoped for. It was not until the end of his run when he finally got the breaks he was looking for. He rode two good waves back-to-back, putting him in first place. Then, Joh Azuchi, the Japanese surfer who competed after Watanabe, outscored him with an 8.6-point wave. It was enough to secure Azuchi the individual gold medal; Watanabe finished just 0.16 points behind Azuchi with a 16.44 final score and a silver medal. Team USA racked up 7,003 points to take home the gold, edging out second-place Team Hawaii’s 6,740 points. This was the second gold medal for Team USA, which also won in 2015.



The experience, for Watanabe, was humbling. He credits his practice in Kyokushin karate, in which he is a black belt, in helping him stay grounded. “It really helps me with respect and discipline,” he said. “It helps me respect everyone and it’s really humbling. They make sure you’re not a stuck-up kid.” The discipline Watanabe learned from karate has fueled his passion for surfing — a sport he picked up when he was 7 years old at the urging of his father, Masato.

Masato found professional surfing teacher and coach Brad Gerlach when Watanabe was 10. Gerlach has been working with Watanabe ever since. “In a nutshell, [Taro] has the drive to be the best, is humble, and has great guidance and support,” Gerlach said.

Watanabe practices between three and four hours during the week, often waking up at 5 a.m. to get in a couple of hours on the water before school. On the weekends, Watanabe said he is out in the water as much as he can be. “It’s an addicting feeling,” Watanabe said. “I feel like I have to go in the ocean every day and ride the waves and feel the breeze.”

Photos by Dave Mullen and WSL









Beck Adler is a 14 year-old surfer who grew up in Venice, CA and lives in Topanga Canyon. We put together some free surfing, contest footage and a trip to Central America in his latest edit Punching Dragons.Follow @beck.adler on Instagram.


Topanga's Jake Chandler

Surfing First Point, Malibu with Brooke Carlson Film/Edit by Beth O'Rourke


John Simon is not your average high school-aged, purist surfer bloke. An avid student of surfing history, style and board design, John connects us to an earlier time when perfect trim ruled the day and groms shaped regularly in their parents garage.



Malibu's Soleil Errico, Womens USA Longboard Pro National Champion
November 5 - 6, 2016
Oceanside, California


Malibu's Brooke Carlson heads up north (Ventura) to spread some Christmas cheer.

Film/Edit by Beth O'Rourke/SeaLevelTV
From Venice Beach, CA via Maui, this goofyfoot’s game is as thick as the coat of sunscreen on his face. (Thick.) He’s confident beyond his years and proves that when you stomp full rotators and don’t pay mind to the opinions of others, you can rock pink Crocs and people will still be friends with you.


Beck took 2nd in Boys and 1st in Juniors


Beck is a 13 year-old surfer living in Topanga, California.


Malibu resident Soleil Errico won the USA Surfing national championship in the girls Under-18 longboard on June 10 in Oceanside, Calif.

Errico competed on Day 2 of the championship, which occurred June 9-12.

Last month, Errico also came away victorious in the Western Surfing Association West Coast Championship, where she finished first in the U18 Longboard and the Women’s Open All Ages Longboard events.

Photos: USA Surfing/Jack McDaniel.


Meet Brooke Carlson, First Point Malibu local. Even though she's only been surfing since the tender age of 8 (that's four years to the mathematically challenged) she's mastered moves that some folks will never be able to pull off, no matter many how much of their hard-earned cash they drop on the best private lessons money can buy.

Brooke's stoke and joy in and out of the water is contagious and she never loses her cool in the often hectic, crowded, world renown line up at Malibu's first point. Her mom drives her to and from the beach almost every day of the week so Brooke can get as much time in the water, perfecting her game and bringing massive style, good vibes and a positive outlook.

By SeaLevel.tv


West Adler is a 16 year-old who loves surfing. In this video he's riding his 9'4" Farberow Model shaped by Scott Anderson and an Album Zero shaped by Matt Parker. Most of the waves are from the Venice Pier and there are a couple of sequences from Zeros back in December. Anyway, they're mostly lefts.