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Showing posts with label Featured Stories. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Featured Stories. Show all posts


From Surf Academy:

Please meet some water safety Wednesday heroes: Gretta Johnson, Ethan Foley, and Miles Carlson . These three worked together this afternoon at practice to listen, spot, and assist a man in distress about 250 yards out from shore. Once Gretta and Ethan were paddling toward the swimmer, Miles came in and got help to call the lifeguards, who responded in mere minutes to perform a rescue.

The man was paddled to shore by guards. He was wearing street clothes—a cotton shirt and cargo shorts—and was unfamiliar with how rip currents operate. He was unfamiliar with beach indicators—he couldn’t tell where he had entered the water and how far he had drifted.

At the opening of practice this day, we had a talk about water emergencies and how to coordinate and respond to any mishap in the sea. The kids were listening.

Ocean safety and swim skills should be as familiar to us in Los Angeles as learning to walk, skate, love the Lakers, and cheer for the Dodgers. Unfortunately, there are major gaps in access and education to water and these gaps fall along racial lines.

There is programming out there designed to bridge these gaps in access and we recommend investing your time and energy in the following organizations to help broaden the horizons of Angelinos unfamiliar with their birthright: the sea.
I first saw Allen Sarlo surf when I was 12 years old. It was a summer day at Malibu in 1984, back when the creek used to let out up at Third Point, and the sand filtered down along the groomed cobbles, creating fast, perfect rippable, world-class waves that connected for 300 yards or more. A phenomenon — and a golden era for the famed point long steeped in rich surf history; and one that saw the El Niños of the ’80s blast so much sand down the point that Rabbit Bartholomew had claimed the ‘Bu as the “best high performance small wave point break in the world.” By Todd Proctor



I first saw Allen Sarlo surf when I was 12 years old. It was a summer day at Malibu in 1984, back when the creek used to let out up at Third Point, and the sand filtered down along the groomed cobbles, creating fast, perfect rippable, world-class waves that connected for 300 yards or more. A phenomenon — and a golden era for the famed point long steeped in rich surf history; and one that saw the El Niños of the ’80s blast so much sand down the point that Rabbit Bartholomew had claimed the ‘Bu as the “best high performance small wave point break in the world.”

It was on one of these days, during a week long sizeable six-foot Southern Hemi swell; my sister had just dropped me off down at First Point at the gap in the Adamson Wall to check it. I remember the perfection of it all. It was like looking through a timeless portal at a lineup where for a moment life itself stood still; my young brain burned a permanent mind photo that day of the oily glassy conditions, zero wind, the smell of the salt in the air, the sun piercing from the south, and the crisp sound of sculpted lips cracking peeling green perfection as sets marched their way across towards the pier. The peaceful spirit of the ancient Chumash seemed to permeate the air.


Photo: Ben Tomson/Surfing With Ben


As I scrambled to get out there, the shadow of a huge figure came lumbering down the stairs. It looked like the Incredible Hulk, some kind of superhero, maybe even a bit werewolf; but definitely not human. My grom buddy whispered to me, “Whatever you do don’t look now, but that’s Allen Sarlo. He’s the best out here, he gets all the best waves, and he can crush your skull with one hand!”…and it was all true, except thankfully I never got my skull crushed.


Photos: Courtesy Allen Sarlo


They called Allen (and still do) the “Wave Killer” because nobody went faster and threw bigger sprays. If you got stuck behind him on a wave, the trench his bottom turns made would buck you off your board like a boat wake. Allen spent a lot of time in Hawaii early on, and was one of the first guys to charge big Backdoor in the late ’70s and early ’80s when everyone went left because the right at Pipe wasn’t yet considered an actual surfable wave. He was on both the IPS and ASP world tours and was one of the original Dogtown Z-Boys. He was also one of the first guys to give a face to big-wave surfing along with his close friend Mark Foo. It was actually at Mark Foo’s house on my first trip to the North Shore in 1990 that I first met Allen. He said, “Hey I know you — what are you doing here? Then he says, “Ahh, so you decided to leave the rat race and get some real waves huh?”

Flash forward a couple decades later, I had became a shaper in my late teens and was now in it for life. And Allen says to me one day, “Hey, come by my house — I wanna show you my garage. It’s full of every board I’ve ever had…let’s look through the different ones and I can tell you what does and doesn’t work for me. And let’s do a board.” It’s led to many boards since and a fun design process — but most important of all, a cherished friendship.


At 62, still shooting the pier, for over 40 years. Photo: Trent Stevens


So back at Allen’s house, it was like a museum. There were handshaped Al’s from the early ’80s, a multitude of boards from the now extinct Blue Hawaii, a couple Diffenderfers, Jeff Ho’s, Rodstokers, Rawsons, Con Surfboards, R.Sleighs, Zuma Jays, and the list could go on for some time as I think there was close to 200 boards stashed in the rafters, on the walls, in racks, piled up in corners; boards everywhere. He pulled out different ones and would be like, “This one has good drive, but too much nose rocker and is hard to get into waves.” Or, “This one has the perfect volume and dimensions for paddling into anything, but it’s too loose in turns”….”This one turns insane, but I can’t make it across flat sections”…”this one flies, but it’s too light when I come off the bottom it loses speed”…

So we looked around at what aspects of the various designs had worked through the years, and which aspects needed to be updated. Much the same process when working with anyone I’ve never built a board for prior. We establish a baseline and work from there: what dims and volume paddles best, what kind of rocker suits their wave and their particular style and approach to that wave, and a plan shape that matches their build/body type and body mechanics. In Allen’s case, there has been a full rotator cuff replacement and a full knee replacement. Eventually every surfer has an injury/recovery story, so it’s always important to take those things into consideration when putting together a one-off custom design. Hull contours, rail shape, fin placement also follow suit, playing major roles.



Our baseline started with the Monstachief design. A board I had already been doing for a few years to fill a gap; a need for bigger guys and power surfers to have an alternative shortboard design made appropriate to their build so they didn’t have to resort to funshapes or longboards if they didn’t want to.

I knew a lot of surfers from the ’80s and ’90s that were rippers, and in that 200-250+ lbs range. A lot of them had to quit surfing for many years when they started families. And when they came back to it many years later, the moves were still in there, but the body didn’t necessarily follow the way they remembered. So the Monstachief came to be. Not just a resized big version of a chippy shortboard, but all the appropriate geometry and design built from the ground up to cater to those big guys who still had the grit, but needed the right equipment to get them where they wanted to go. So as to give larger-framed surfers a platform that would use their stature as an advantage rather than a disadvantage; to create fun for a cross-section of the tribe that was getting overlooked.

Like each surfer I work with, Allen’s boards are designed and tuned specifically for him. Allen continues to this day to be the King of the Point through healthy living, surfing, kiteboarding or foiling every day. He runs a successful business, and operates off the motto “work to surf”. He takes an active role with the Mauli Ola foundation. His wife’s a sweetheart and both his grown children are mellow, kind people that shred. In his own words Allen says, “There is almost no better feeling than sharing the love of surfing with friends and family. Surfing keeps us young. We found the fountain of youth surfing. Thank you for the magic boards Todd, much appreciated. I’m surfing better than ever on your boards.”

As a tribe we must remember the past, know our people, design the future, and honor the elders. This is a board design that seeks to do just that. – Todd

Proctor Surf

Malibu Sharks Surf Team member Saxon Rhodes surfed her way to a first-place finish as two groups of Sharks surfers grabbed wins in the team’s last event of the season.

Rhodes, a senior and seasoned youth surfer, won the women’s shortboard bracket in the Scholastic Surf Series meet at the Tarpits in Carpinteria on Feb. 1. She outlasted five other surfers at the top of the division, including a teammate, to lead the Malibu Black squad (surfers at the top skill level) to a 60-27 victory over Palisades. The Malibu White group also won, downing Oak Park, 43-41.

Contending in the exhibition were surf squads also from Loyola, Oaks Christian, Santa Barbara, Santa Monica and Westlake high schools. The teenage wave riders vied in shortboard, longboard and bodyboard surfing brackets on waves that were around five or six feet in height.

The event was the fifth competition since October for the teams, which are all in the surf series’ LA to Santa Barbara High School division.

Vanessa Clark, also a Malibu Black member, placed one spot behind Rhodes in the women’s shortboard, while Malibu White surfer Whitney Shanahan placed fourth and her teammate Chole Rapf finished fifth. In the coed bodyboard, Malibu Black member Gavin Cross finished second and Malibu White surfer Kai Owens finished third. Malibu Black members Evan Kassoy and Sebastian Bluhm placed fourth and fifth in the men’s shortboard, respectively, and Cross finished third in the men’s longboard. Maxine Kelly, a Malibu Black surfer, finished fifth in women’s longboard, and Nicky Chittendon, a Malibu White member, finished sixth.
Malibu Surf Team members pictured, from left: Evan Kassoy, Sebastian Bluhm, Kai Owens, Max Gourson, Gavin Cross, Vanessa Clark, Whitney Shanahan, Saxon Rhodes, Chloe Rapf, Nicky Chittendon, Maxine Kelly; front row: Coach John Cross and Coach Dale Rhodes; back row: Coach Jorge Lopez-Vida. Photo courtesy: Shelley Myers

Malibu Sharks Surf Team member Saxon Rhodes surfed her way to a first-place finish as two groups of Sharks surfers grabbed wins in the team’s last event of the season.

Rhodes, a senior and seasoned youth surfer, won the women’s shortboard bracket in the Scholastic Surf Series meet at the Tarpits in Carpinteria on Feb. 1. She outlasted five other surfers at the top of the division, including a teammate, to lead the Malibu Black squad (surfers at the top skill level) to a 60-27 victory over Palisades. The Malibu White group also won, downing Oak Park, 43-41.

Contending in the exhibition were surf squads also from Loyola, Oaks Christian, Santa Barbara, Santa Monica and Westlake high schools. The teenage wave riders vied in shortboard, longboard and bodyboard surfing brackets on waves that were around five or six feet in height.

The event was the fifth competition since October for the teams, which are all in the surf series’ LA to Santa Barbara High School division.

Vanessa Clark, also a Malibu Black member, placed one spot behind Rhodes in the women’s shortboard, while Malibu White surfer Whitney Shanahan placed fourth and her teammate Chole Rapf finished fifth. In the coed bodyboard, Malibu Black member Gavin Cross finished second and Malibu White surfer Kai Owens finished third. Malibu Black members Evan Kassoy and Sebastian Bluhm placed fourth and fifth in the men’s shortboard, respectively, and Cross finished third in the men’s longboard. Maxine Kelly, a Malibu Black surfer, finished fifth in women’s longboard, and Nicky Chittendon, a Malibu White member, finished sixth.

Malibu, coached by John Cross, Dale Rhodes and Jorge Lopez-Vida, will have a few surfers competing in the state championships from April 25-27 in Oceanside.

This story was written by McKenzie Jackson and was originally publish in The Malibu Times


Last weekend, @black.surfers held a Surf Meet Up down at the Huntington Beach Pier for Los Angeles and Orange County surfers to celebrate Black History month:

"It's hard to describe just how happy I am to have met and shared an awesome day surfing with these folks! Y'all were incredible, humble and passionate and this Black History Month meetup would have been nothing without y'all!

I hope this is the first of many, and I will be creating a formal LA surf chat so y'all can start meeting up more frequently!

There will be more photos to come, but here are a few hot off the press from Sheldon Botler, our amazing photographer!" - Kayiita, founder of @black.surfers








Check out @black.surfers on Instagram for more.

Bianca Mitchell, founder of Ocean Goddess Surf, is the guest on the newest Salted Spirit Podcast.





We posted our 2019 Venice Surf-A-Thon Contest Coverage last month, but it lack the official result and the awards party photos, well we finally got the official Venice Surf-A-Thon results and awards party recap, directly from the VSAT official himself, Ger-i Lewis. Here it is: The 26th annual Venice Surf-A-Thon Surf contest was once again a rip roaring success!

The surf cooperated as well as the weather also! The day began with 2-4ft glassy peaks and scattered clouds with just enough coverage to keep the glare down for the judges. The contest hosted 43 men, women, and children. Ages ranged from 5 years old to 67 years old. The contest raised $1,734.00 for MLD Christian Charity School Mucas, Mindanao in the Philippine Islands. 14 competitors were granted financial hardship waivers. 9 competitors were international competitors.



Masters Division
1st Place - Eric Weis (USA)
2nd Place - Steve Shelp (USA)
3 Place - Brock Myreux (USA)

Menehunes
1st Place - Rickson Massie (USA)
2nd Place - J.Packham (USA)
3rd Place - Uchu Jin (Japan)

Jr. Women
1st Place - Stephanie Wise (USA)
2nd Place -Marly Kay (USA)
3rd Place - Mimi Sullivan (USA)

Senior Women
1st Place - Almudena Soria (Spain)
2nd Place - Nicole Lynch (USA)
3rd Place - Natsumi Ota (Japan)



Mens Division
1st Place - Cole Sweeny (USA)
2nd Place - Mariano Romero (Argentina)
3rd Place - Pablo (USA)

Jr.Mens Division
1st Place - Bradly Kay (USA)
2nd Place - Ben Cohen (USA)
3rd Place - Nathan Cosworth (USA)

Longboard Division
1st Place - Norm Antonio (USA)
2nd Place - Ari Ari (New Zealand)
3rd Place - Brock Myreux (USA)

Body Surfing
1st Place - Nathan B (USA)
2nd Place - Rick Massie (USA)
3rd Place - Mike Wood (USA)

Most Outstanding Surfer Award
Katie

Most Radical Move Award
Mimi Sullivan



The 26th Annual Venice Surf-A-Thon Surf Contest Award Show, hosted by The Sidewalk Cafe featured KOZ from Kyoto Japan singing dance hall and reggae inspired songs to the delight of the crowd. Cognitive Dissonance (former Suicidal Tendencies member) got the crown fired up and DJ Jacques kept the vibe up in between sets. Finally Col Klink closed out the show with their set of inspired and enthusiastic crowd favorites as the surfers rocked and rolled into the night.



Thank you sponsors, competitors,volunteers and participants one and all!

These Award Party Photos were shot by Heidi Lemmon, check out about 50 more party photos in this photo album:
Venice Surf-A-Thon Awards Photo Album



For all the contest surfing photos, check out contest surf photos gallery:
2019 Venice Surf-A-Thon Surf Photos Gallery


Hulu
December was a good month for waves at our local spots and we got a ton of surf photos from a bunch of days at a couple of surf spots, from Venice up to Malibu.

Below is the list of Surf Spots with the days we got photos for during the entire month of December. Each link will take you to the page with a few surf photos and at the bottom of those photos there will be a link to that photographer's gallery where you can find all the surf photos for that day (many times there's well over 100 photos to check out). Most of these photographers offer high-res downloads and prints for sale.

Secos

Secos - Tuesday 12-3-2019




Topanga

Topanga - Saturday 12-7-2019
Topanga - Saturday 12-7-2019 Video
Topanga - Monday 12-16-2019
Topanga - Thursday 12-26-2019


Venice Pier

Venice Pier - Sunday 12-1-2019
Venice Pier North Side - Saturday 12-14-2019
Venice Pier South Side - Saturday 12-14-2019
Venice Pier - Venice Surf-A-Thon 2019
Venice Pier - Tuesday 12-24-2019
Venice Pier - Christmas 2019
Venice Pier - Friday 12-27-2019


Wanna see last month's Photo Gallery Recap?
Click November Surf Spot Photos Recap





The 26th Annual Venice Surf-A-Thon was held on Saturday, December 14th, once again taking place at the Venice Pier. The contest is a grassroots local tradition that has evolved from a mentorship gathering for youth beset by gang violence to an inter-generational celebration of community. The contest has been a labor of love for it's founder Ger-I Lewis.

Ger-I founded the Venice Surf-A-Thon in 1993 after returning home from military service.

"I wished to do something for the children , young adults and the community in general that is fun and has a positive influence on everyone." says Ger-I. "For sure back in the day the contest was edgy as so was I! Instead of handing out trophies at the beach like most contests, I incorporated the awards party to give everyone a chance to shine. Inviting local talent as well the bikini contest was also a strategy to enhance and create a Venice culture showcase. Well times have changed and folks have mellowed, the bikini contest is no longer a part of the event as many of the original contestants are grandfathers now! The event has a generational community expectation and Surf-A-thon has taken on a family atmosphere. Many world class surfers, celebrities, have supported and donated to The Venice Surf-A-Thon including Mimi Miyagi, Peter Destafino, Perry Farrell, C.R. Stecyk, Danny Trejo, Robert Trujillo (of Metallica), Noah Budroe, Chris Ward, Tonan, Tina Cheri, DJ Muggs, Kid Frost, and Beowülf. Moreover the contest has provided a an opportunity for surfers to get a start in competition surfing."

These contest photos were shot by Six12 Media.






















Custom trophies created by Brock Mayeux were passed out to all the winners later Saturday night at the Awards Show.




So who won what? Not having attended the awards show, it was hard to track down the official results from anyone. But here's what info we did gather: Stephanie Wise got 1st for the Women with Nicole Lynchie getting 2nd, Ricksen Massie got 1st for the Groms, one of the Packham kids get 2nd. Ricksens's pops Rickie got 3rd in body Surfing. Eric Wise won 1st in something, so did Cole Sweeney (since we can tell from theese screen shots grabbed from Elisabeth Fried's Instagram Stories.

You can find 100 more surf contest photos, all full size and in high-resolution, in this photo gallery:

Venice Surf-A-Thon Photo Gallery